Wątek: Julia Hedberg w AMA na temat Tournament Policy  (Przeczytany 347 razy)

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Flasher

Julia Hedberg w AMA na temat Tournament Policy
« dnia: 14 Listopad, 2014, 14:32:01 »
+4

Niedawno Julia Hedberg, nazywana również Judge Mamą, uczestniczyła na grupie FB Zodiac w AMA.
Julia jest bardzo ważną osobistością w naszym półświatku kolorowych smoków, a w czasie akcji zostało poruszonych kilka ciekawych rzeczy dotyczących polityki turniejowej.

Link do serii screenshotów: http://imgur.com/a/z79LT , a poniżej macie wersje tekstową.

ENJOY!


Question from Geoffrey Dai:
While writing your decklist for regionals/YCS/Any YGO event, for cards with names like Blackwing- Bora the Spear can you write it as just Bora the Spear?

Answer:
The best way to avoid a Deck List Error is to completely fill in the name. However, sometimes space and time is a factor. Most head judges will accept abbreviations, as long as you are consistent (use a similar abbreviation for all Blackwings) and do all you can to make sure your meaning is clear. BW-Bora the Spear ought to be fine. However, you don't want to write BLS when you mean Black Luster Soldier - Envoy of the Beginning. It isn't the judges' responsibility to figure out what you mean, you have to make sure that it's clear.

Question from Ryan Freeburger:
Why can't we double sleeve our decks? Ive heard multiple ideas but I wanted to know if there was something you all clearly thought of when you made that rule. Was there a certain incident that caused the Prohibition or was it always in mind?

Answer:
You can't double sleeve your decks for a number of reasons. One, there are a number of sneaky ways to cheat that become a lot easier with two sleeves. No, I am not going to teach you how to do it. Two, the more sleeves you put on a card the harder it is to see what it is. I do get that people like the additional protection and swank factor of multiple sleeves, but it's better for the tournament to not allow them.

Question from Warren Bonner:
Why are north American tcg rulings so different than everywhere else like why does deneb not get an eff here but gets it in ocg?

Answer:
Why Rulings Are Different: this isn't really a tournament policy question but I can give you an idea of how it works for a YCS in North America. 1) I select the HJ. 2) The HJ and I select the Assistant Head Judges. 3) I request that the HJ send me a list of questions they would like answered. 4) I hand the list to R&D. 5) We do or do not get answers. Sometimes it's definite and sometimes there's still some internal discussion. I pass any answers received back to the HJ. If there are unanswered questions, the HJ and AHJs will discuss among themselves to arrive at a consensus. Often new questions will arise at the Judge Q&A during pre reg. If an answer cannot be obtained, they'll do the same thing - discuss and decide.
This is one of the most experienced pools of judges we have, and they put a lot of thought into the decisions. Lots of times they are upheld, other times more information will come later - PSCT on a card, clarification from Japan - and the ruling will change. (We won't stick with the first ruling just to be stubborn).
Anyone who has played this game since the beginning knows that's kind of how Yu-Gi-Oh! goes. PSCT has made things a lot easier, but there are still questions.

Question from Luke Delaney:
Julia , My T.o isn't a qualified judge and gives out a number of bad rulings every other week , and is genuinely an ******* . What can i do about this ?

Answer:
On the local level? Talk to the store owner. If he IS the store owner, well, that makes it difficult. Judges at the local level don't have to be registered, and even when they are it can be difficult to get them replaced.
Second
Answer:
My suggestion? Get a registered, competent judge to come in and judge instead. A surprisingly large number of judges begin their judge career simply because they get frustrated with the low quality or absence of judges at their local events.

Question from Alex Lakomy:
When you email support and get a ruling, even though its official, it is by no means a binding piece of evidence. An incident occured when someone emailed support and they said back that Royal Command negated all effects of flip effect monsters, which is not true, so how is it reliable?

Answer:
Judges aren't sending those emails. Sometimes the representative answering the email gets it wrong (for example, Royal Command). The main reason they're not recognized as "official" - as in, run to the hills and post the screenshots far and wide - is because it's so easy to counterfeit an email.

Question from Nick Smith:
After a player’s ban is lifted can banned players till take the judge test?

Answer:
Yes they can

Question from Erik Garcia:
I passed the judge and policy test and haven't received any email. I've also checked my spam mail and nothing is there. Any ideas?

Answer:
I process the tests on Wednesdays, unless I'm out of the office. Then I send a mass email to everyone who: 1) included a valid COSSY ID, 2) included a valid email, and 3) passed. If you don't get an email taking all of this into account, it's either in your spam (bonus points to you for checking) or its also possible your ISP blocked it because my email routes through Japan.
If you've waited a week or two and you are positive you met the requirements you can email [email protected] and give me your name and COSSY ID and ask me to check for you. The next time I open up the full test log, I can look to see if you passed. Or you can just take the test again and see if that one goes through.

Question from Greg Cross:
Are the contents of calculator cases considered on the play field or in the deckbox? I.e., a player has a few copies of cards in their calculator case. Should the player remove said cards?

Answer:
Yes. Don't keep cards other than token cards in your calculator case. A player shouldn't have anything on the table that they aren't using in the match. Don't put the judge team in the crappy position of having to decide if the extra cards you have tucked in your calculator case are being used to cheat with.

Question from Emanuel Groves:
If you have a translation for a card in your deck where do you keep it?

Answer:
Translation cards - keep them anywhere that is easy to access, while not being anywhere they could be mistaken for cards in your Deck. So! Not in the Deckbox, not in your sleeve, not in your calculator case. My suggestion is to get one of those single card micro binders, like the ones we made for Pegasus League, and put all of your translation cards in there. Order them any way you like. Show the binder to your opponent at the start of the match, and say "I have some foreign cards in my Deck, and all the translations are in here" (the opponent of course does not get to look through it). Then put the binder someplace where it is safe but easily accessible, like a zippered outside compartment of your backpack.

Question from Jonathan Ramirez:
Who comes up with the tournament policy?

Answer:
Tournament Policy! How does it happen?? One person writes out the draft, and then other people discuss it, and changes are made. KDE-US, KDE-E, and KDE all contribute to what finally makes it in there. I maintain them, meaning I take the responsibility of working on the updates and managing them as they make the rounds for discussion and approval. It's a time consuming process, I was hoping to have an update before the end of the year but I don't think it's going to happen.

Question from Yeriel Cordero:
Is there really anything to update to policies. I mean... Pretty much everything that is within the realms of reason is written in those policy docs. And so far there hasn't been any real issues (that I am aware of) revolving around the policy docs.

Answer:
Oh yeah. The one we did in...April? last year was a big one. Changed the whole formatting of the documents with all the examples, etc. Then in November, we added in a clause in the Yu-Gi-Oh! one to allow Extra Deck sleeves in different colors, and disallow e-cigs.
The hard part about writing the documents is you start with a certain level of understanding, so what seems crystal clear to you isn't always crystal clear to your player base and judges. So when I notice a trend of misunderstanding, I make a note to try and clarify it in the next update. I have a pretty long list of clarifications and etc. that I want to make in the next update, and include a few other things that people have been puzzled by and we haven't yet provided an "official" policy on, like deck searches.

Second Answer:
And also, even though I tell myself that I've seen it all, players continue to surprise me. Many many times I say to myself "Well...I never thought I'd have to tell them they can't do THAT" ...
 
Third Answer:
Clarifications to a lot of things, and hopefully an official policy on deck searches. I don't create all the policy though, I just sort of shepherd it along. There always has to be agreement between the three different branches, and what works for one doesn't always work for the others.

Question from Joey Frighetto:
Julia, understand the whole no double sleeving thing, but what about using those perfect fit sleeves on a card as well as say like the purple WCQ sleeves from this past Nationals? I know I speak for a lot of players where they'd have fairly expensive cards (ie: YCS Prize Cards) that they want to keep in as good condition as possible and seeing how we aren't allowed to keep it in the protective plastic case they come in, would like the whole perfect fit sleeve + a normal ultra pro or Konami brand sleeve work?

Answer:
Another excellent question! I'm glad you asked because I would like to explain it. It is a perfectly reasonable argument. But in my experience, it's easier to enforce clear cut rules. When you say "you cannot do something, well, unless you do it like this...then it is OK" it usually ends up creating massive headaches. If we say "you cannot double sleeve, except with this or that" then we have to deal with "well what about this?" "how about this other thing?" "Well why is it ok to do this and not that?" I mean...look at how many people already have no clue at all about a lot of basic tournament policy. They get their info second, third, fourth, etc. hand and it's usually completely wrong.
Lots of the rules seem arbitrary, and keep people from doing things that they want to that don't seem like they'd be too much of a problem. But we have to think on a bigger scale than the individual, and think of the overall good of the tournament. What is going to keep it moving along? What is going to make things the easiest for players and judges alike? I'm part of the Organized Play team and we have to find the best balance between "this game is fun to play, I want to do my own thing" and "We will never get out of here before 2am at this rate". And yeah, lots of times it's going to slant more towards "Please, oh please, let us get out of the venue before it becomes tomorrow".


Follow-Up  Question also from Joey:
(not trying to argue this because I understand and agree completely, just was curious on reasoning behind it) But, couldn't this just go back to the extra deck being able to be a different color sleeve compared to your main/side deck then? And then just in turn end up being a whole "you can do this, but you can't do this, yet you can do this" etc.. kinda thing? (not sure if I'm explaining that well...

Answer:
Yeah, personally I would have been happy just leaving the Extra Deck rule the way it was. Because that's exactly what happened. I've been working with tournament policy, for more than one game, for a very long time now. I think sometimes people assume all the rules and policy are made by corporate drones in Japan, but it really isn't the case. The base work that goes into the tournament policy comes from years and years of experience of what worked and what went horribly, horribly wrong.
Ultimately? I want the most people to have the best time possible when they participate in Organized Play. On the way to that goal, smaller things do get in the way of some people having part of a good time. I know a lot of the decisions that get made seem like we're trying to piss people off, but it's really not the case.
Inteligent tym się różni od nieinteligenta, że nie obraża się o żarty, rozumie żarty i lubi żarty. /Władysław Bartoszewski/

 

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